The Latest Insights from Leading NOW

Posts about Talent Development (4)

9 Reasons Companies Aren't Closing The Leadership Gender Gap

Last week we released our updated research entitled “Closing The Leadership Gender Gap: The Missing 33%TM and Conventional Advice to Women.”
1 min read | Kelly Primus
Read ON!
Talent Development Closing the Gender Gap The Missing 33% Diversity & Inclusion

News & Tips on Women's Advancement & More...

Keep your eyes open for our colorful "white" paper on women's advancement. In the meantime, did you see these?
6 min read | Susan Colantuono
Read ON!
Talent Development Closing the Gender Gap Gender Dynamics The Missing 33%

News & Tips on Women's Advancement & More

Spotting (and Developing) Leaders! Thanks to Nneka C. who last month pointed us to the HBR article on 21st Century Talent Spotting because of the alignment between the model in one of the sidebars and Leading Women's definition of leadership. For over 14 years, we've been defining leadership as "using the greatness in you to achieve and sustain extraordinary outcomes by engaging the greatness in others."
4 min read | Susan Colantuono
Read ON!
Talent Development Closing the Gender Gap The Missing 33%

Making the Case for Women's Initiatives

In spite of decades of research identifying organizational barriers to women's advancement and strong business cases for getting more women into leadership positions, we continue to run into organizations (sadly often HR executives) who resist calls to take action to close the gender gap. One organization we know of treated their women's initiative leaders in the same way that our colleagues were treated back in the 1970s (when women's initiatives WERE a "futuristic social experiment").
4 min read | Susan Colantuono
Read ON!
Talent Development Closing the Gender Gap IWiN

Gender Dynamics and Talent Decisions: Partnering with Men

Kudos to three of our clients, Turner Construction, DHL Global Forwarding EMEA and Alcatel-Lucent. Here's why: As part of its program for high potential women, Turner invited executives and the women's managers to presentations on The Missing 33%™ and the importance of PIE Mentoring™. Both sessions gave the managers insights into the subtle ways that men are often groomed for senior positions, but women aren't.
2 min read | Susan Colantuono
Read ON!
Talent Development Gender Dynamics Leadership Managers Mindsets

How Women's Leadership Development Programs Fail Black Women

February is Black History Month in the United States and what's historic this year is that while all around us change is endemic, when it comes to the advancement of Black women in major corporations, little is new. With a few exceptions - most notably Ursula Burns, former CEO of Xerox, the percentages of African American women at the top of and in director positions at Fortune 500 companies is appallingly small. The reasons are many, and we're grateful to share this insight gleaned from our work with multicultural women. For more African American women to make history in major corporations, women's leadership programs must address the fact that conventional advice to women can create problems for women of color.
3 min read | Susan Colantuono
Read ON!
Talent Development Career Breakthrough Leadership Diversity & Inclusion Women of Color

Gender Dynamics: A CEO Who "Gets" the Impacts

Michael Simonds, CEO of UNUM wrote recently about women's advancement and closing the leadership gender gap. The whole article is worth a read and especially his awareness of the impact of gender dynamics (gender bias, stereotypes, assumptions) on women's advancement.
3 min read | Susan Colantuono
Read ON!
Talent Development Closing the Gender Gap Gender Dynamics Managers Mindsets

Leadership Lessons: What Women Haven't Been Told About Career Success

Career advice received by women covers only 2/3 of the success equation in business. This Missing 33%™ has serious implications for a woman’s chances of being seen as high potential, receiving promotions to senior positions, receiving optimal benefits from mentoring relationships and nurturing the next generation of women leaders. Background Leading Women recently asked over 2000 women, “What’s the best career advice you’ve received?” The verbatim responses they submitted were given by bosses, friends, parents, mentors, colleagues and others. We analyzed these responses and found an entire category of advice that women haven’t been given – a category that creates barriers to career success. Why? Unless on a specialized technical track, people are promoted on the basis of their perceived potential and success as a leader. So, what does this mean? As defined in the book No Ceiling, No Walls, and used by managers in F500 companies including Sunoco, PepsiCo, DePuy/J&J, Amgen, Pfizer and others: “Leadership is using the greatness in you to achieve and sustain extraordinary outcomes by engaging the greatness in others”. This is a definition in which all 3 parts are required for success. Using the greatness in you – this means tapping the essential best of who you are, your strengths, knowledge and attributes; leading in alignment with espoused values, and more. To achieve and sustain extraordinary outcomes – this means hitting or exceeding the outcomes that your organization has determined are important for its current and future success in the marketplace. Elements of this include business acumen, strategic acumen and financial acumen. By engaging the greatness in others – means engaging others’ positive aspects such as hope, creativity, commitment, egalitarianism, compassion (as opposed to their most negative such as hatred, fear, bigotry, etc.) and aligning them to key outcomes. All 3 elements are interdependent and balance is necessary among them. For example, someone who achieves outcomes by commanding it out of their people (lack of focus on engaging others) doesn’t meet the definition of leader and will ultimately cost the company money due to high turnover. Someone who over-focuses on engaging others without attention to outcomes will direct happy sailors on a sinking ship. And someone who over-focuses on personal growth will ultimately be out of a job. It follows, then, that the success equation has 3 factors: Use Personal Greatness Achieve and Sustain Outcomes Engage the Greatness in Others The Success Equation in Practice What do executives and boards look for in high potential candidates and candidates for C-suite positions? For answers Leading Women analyzed key factors from Leaders at All Levels: Deepening the Talent Pool to Solve the Succession Crisis  by Ram Charan, Boards at Work by Ram Charan, Building Better Boards by Beth Behan and David Nadler and interviews with executives. We then assigned each factor to the related 1/3rd of the leadership definition. Here’s what we found. Of the factors: 50% relate to Achieve and Sustain Outcomes 27% relate to Engage the Greatness in Others 23% relate to Use Personal Greatness In essence, when identifying high potential candidates for career advancement, executives and boards look for people with business and strategic acumen by a factor of nearly 2 to 1. This is significantly out of line with the advice that women are given about career success. 
2 min read | Susan Colantuono
Read ON!
Talent Development Closing the Gender Gap The Missing 33% Diversity & Inclusion

Taking Women to the Top: "Be FOR The Business"

When we asked women to tell us the best career advice they received and applied our definition of leadership to analyze what we heard, we discovered that:
2 min read | Susan Colantuono
Read ON!
Talent Development Closing the Gender Gap Breakthrough Leadership

Taking Women to the Top - Executive Communication

Conventional advice to women has little to say about executive communication, board communication and media skills. It's one reason why conventional advice to women won't close the gender gap at the top and why Leading Women focuses on these skills in our Leadership Mastery and Breakthrough Leadership programs. So, it's refreshing to come across a high-value news release from Anne D. Grant on executive communication. In the excerpt below, notice that among the skills being tested were use of numbers, positive monetary impact and development of products/process (i.e. Outcomes). Her findings are aligned with what we teach about Using the Language of Power™ and the Power of Language and with how to Self-Promote with Grace and Authenticity™.
2 min read | Susan Colantuono
Read ON!
Talent Development Leadership